ACTIVISM
Civic guardian since 1947

"Oh, to be free from assailing care; to see no envious faces, no saddened eyes; so see or hear no unkind look or word . . . . To absorb the peace the hills have, to drink in the charm of the brook, and to receive the strength of the mountains by dwelling in their company — this is living! To lose one's self by the side of the sea! Free, indeed, am I!"

— Frederick Rindge


The words above, by the Malibu area's first official homeowner, describe the sense of magic that still prevails in this community and that residents of Malibu Township Council seek to protect. But Rindge, and his wife May, not only were the first homeowners here, they were the area's first activists, devoting hundreds of thousands of dollars to protecting their land from poachers, hunters, the intrusion of highways, and also of railroads. While times have changed, no one can argue that trains still manage to travel north without the extraordinary manage that would have been done to the bluffs had the rails been built along the beach. It is not easy to be an activist and it is not always easy to protect the things you love. But members of Malibu Township Council still


Include information on any stand we have taken on PCH Traffic

MTC supported Malibu Park residents in obtaining "reasonable improvements" of the at Malibu High School. These included X, Y, Z, etc.
Explain this further. Also, INCLUDE A PHOTO OF THE HIGH SCHOOL

Whatever other activist stand we have taken recently.
In one set-up paragraph, describe the features on this page and explain why they are threatened, and what, if any position has been taken by Malibu Township Council. Explain that there is always room for more people to help in this protecting these incredible sites.

Craggy, rough slopes with powerfully etched rocks and strata in pinks and golds and purples characterize Malibu Canyon, where City Council members have supported the controversial removal of the historic Rindge Dam (below). The dam was constructed in 1924 to provide water for the 13,300-acre ranch of Malibu's first homeowners, Frederick and May Rindge. Crops were grown on the land and there were cows and steer on the property that reached from Topanga Canyon to Oxnard.
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Malibu Township Council supports (or does not support) dismantling of Rindge dam because . . . .Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, sapien platea morbi dolor lacus nunc, nunc ullamcorper. Felis aliquet egestas vitae, nibh ante quis quis dolor sed mauris. Erat lectus sem ut lobortis, adipiscing ligula eleifend, sodales fringilla mattis dui nullam. Ac massa aliquet.
Rising from 2,800 to 3,100 feet above the sea, the Santa Monica Mountains block Malibu from the San Fernando Valley, the Conejo Valley, and the Simi Valley. Fire is a constant fear for the 20,000 estimated nearby mountain residents, in an area which, technically, is the portion of Los Angeles County also called "Malibu." Residents of adjacent mountainous areas are enrolled in Malibu Schools (currently part of the Santa Monica/Malibu School system) as well as Malibu Parks, Senior Citizen facilities, and public facilities, such as the library, County Fire Department, and the L.A. County Sheriff's Department.

The Malibu Township Council works to keep this area from improper development and County policies that may be harmful to wildlife and habitat.
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The Santa Monica Mountains area outside city limits of the City of Malibu are equally as magical as the city itself. This glen in L.A. County's Cole and Ava Weintraub Family Park has a variety of habitats, ranging from a mini-Redwood forest, to chaparral, to high desert, cactus forests that grow hundreds of yellow and red prickly pears, referred to by the Southland's Latino population as "Tunas." Maybe include photos of the cacti with the prickly pears.
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The area west of Point Dume (upper center and upper left in background of photo at left) is Zuma Beach, (LINK to Suzanne Guldimann's column for details of name.) only about two miles east of Trancas Fields, recently acquired by the city. City Council, based on public input, has yet to decide how the Trances land will be used. Malibu Township Council can be instrumental in determining how to use Trancas Field.

Malibu Township Council support or doesn't support what re. Trancas Field. What do you think we should do with the land at Trancas Field? (Put another photo at right showing Trancas Field.)

To join Malibu Township Council or make a donation, click
HERE, or hit the "Contact, Join Us" item above in the Navigation Bar. (I might make a button out of this and insert it on various pages in different pages as a graphic element).

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Cars on Pacific Coast Highway kill more people every year than all wildlife in the area including mountain lions, rattlesnakes, sharks, and scorpions.